CNE Releases List of Approved Candidates for Elections to Constituent Assembly

Venezuela’s National Electoral Council (CNE) released Thursday a list of approved candidates for elections to the National Constituent Assembly to be held on July 30.

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The CNE released the list of candidates on Thursday. (Archive)
The CNE released the list of candidates on Thursday. (Archive)
By Lucas Koerner
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Caracas, June 26, 2017 (venezuelanalysis.com) – Venezuela’s National Electoral Council (CNE) released Thursday a list of approved candidates for elections to the National Constituent Assembly to be held on July 30.

Once elected, the 545 delegates to the ANC will set to work on drafting a new constitution for the South American nation, which will subsequently be approved via a national referendum. 

The ANC will be made up of 364 territorial delegates elected by municipality as well as 181 “sectorial” representatives who are chosen by their constituencies. The sectorial delegates include commune activists, workers, indigenous people, students, businesspeople, farmers and fishing workers, senior citizens, and people living with disabilities. 

Over the past month, prospective candidates to the assembly have been working to collect signatures in their municipalities and social sectors in order to meet the CNE registration requirements. 

Among the candidates are top government spokespeople such as former Foreign Minister Delcy Rodriguez, ex-chief of staff Carmen Melendez, and former National Assembly President and “First Combatant” Cilia Flores, as well as representatives from grassroots movements.

The revolutionary Alexis Vive Patriotic Front saw two of its leading candidates, Barbara Martinez and Jesus Silva, accepted for the communal sector and Lara state, respectively.

The Bolivar and Zamora Revolutionary Current likewise succeeded in getting a number of its candidates approved.

Since President Maduro’s announcement of the ANC on May 1, Venezuelan popular movements have largely rallied behind the initiative, which they view not only as a possible solution to the current political crisis but also as a means of institutionalizing the revolutionary gains achieved over the past 18 years.